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Research News

Curated by Amy Akers, PhD, Angioma Alliance Chief Scientific Officer

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Angioma Alliance provides lay summaries of recently published cavernous angioma (cavernous malformation, cavernoma) research, and we report other research-related news. This page is organized by date, with the most recent information first. Please visit Angioma Alliance President and CEO Connie Lee's CEO's Corner for more Angioma Alliance program news.

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March 13, 2019

New research shows promising results for the cholesterol-reducing drug, atorvastatin, as a possible therapy for cavernous angioma. 

In mice, treatment with atorvastatin reduced lesion burden (number and size of lesions) as well as chronic bleeding. These findings from the collaborative Duke and Chicago research teams provide additional support for the need to carefully investigate the effects of this drug on human cavernous angioma patients.

Atorvastatin is currently in clinical trial for the treatment of cavernous angioma with symptomatic hemorrhage. For more information and to learn if you may be eligible to participate, please visit this PAGE.

You can read the detailed abstract from the Journal Stroke, HERE

 

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February 12, 2019

UCSD researchers show us the importance of coagulation factors in relation to cavernous angioma hemorrhage.

Much of what we know about CCM lesion biology and drug targets comes from studies of the diseased tissue - blood vessels (made of endothelial cells). Our current thinking is that an inherited CCM gene mutation causes a disruption of neighboring endothelial cell junctions, resulting in lesion blood vessels that are structurally unsound and that have increased mobility and activity levels, uncharacteristic of typical blood vessel cells.

In a recent study, Dr. Ginsberg's team at the University of California at San Diego identified an increased activity of anticoagulation factors (those that prevent clotting) in response to CCM gene mutation. This finding led them to further investigate coagulation, as it relates to the biology of cavernous angioma.

In the plenary paper published in the Blood Journal, the study team addressed the question - does increased levels of anticoagulation factors lead to hemorrhage in CCM?

They found two anticoagulation components, thrombomodulin (TM) and endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR), that are associated with CCM biology. Both molecules are present at elevated levels in lesion tissue. TM concentration is also at elevated levels in blood plasma of cavernous angioma patients.

In mouse experiments, hemorrhage is associated with TM level (more TM (less coagulation) = more hemorrhage). Genetic experiments to decrease TM production (reduce the amount of protein in the blood vessels), results in a reduction of hemorrhage in CCM mutant mice. Additionally, CCM3 mutant mice, which otherwise would begin bleeding just nine days after birth, show reduced hemorrhage with an antibody-drug treatment that blocks TM activity.

Taken together, these findings show us that anticoagulation is a component of CCM biology. Targeting this system, either alone, or in combination with therapy for the endothelial cells, may provide a new opportunity for drug development.

Thrombomodulin may also serve as a useful biomarker to predict hemorrhage. Given the association of blood plasma levels of this molecule and hemorrhage, with more research, measuring TM could identify those individuals at greatest risk for future hemorrhage event.

The paper made the cover of the January 2019 Blood Journal. You can read the abstract of the paper, HERE

 

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January 22, 2019

New tools developed for surgery on deep lesions

NICO Corporation is a company that develops minimally invasive surgical technologies. BrainPath is one such system used to access deep CCM lesions, as described in this recent publication, available HERE.

 

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January 8, 2019

Furthering the Cancer Connection with CCM3

A team of genetic and cardiovascular disease researchers in Germany recently used CRISPR gene editing technology to develop a cell model that is completely deficient for CCM3 protein. The model is unique because the gene editing ensures the CCM3 deficiency is permanent, whereas other technologies may result in localized or short-term changes. The idea is that these cells, derived from human blood vessel cells, would behave most like those brain blood vessels in human patients that seed the formation of CCM lesions.

This new model supports other recent findings that CCM lesions have a cancer-like behavior. Like cells of a tumor, these cells, that have a long-term deficiency of CCM3, are able to survive longer and replicate faster than cells with some or full function of CCM3. Furthermore, these cells don't sprout and make branches as blood vessel cells should. Instead, they just replicate themselves over and over, likely contributing to the development of CCM lesions.

The authors of this study propose that this cell model might be useful in the future for testing novel therapeutics aimed specifically at CCM type 3.

You can read the entire article from the Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, HERE

 

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November 8-9, 2018

2018 CCM Meeting Summary

The 2018 CCM Meeting continued on a great tradition of success – for the first time, we had over 100 attendees with representatives from five continents, five drug companies, three advocacy organizations, government officials and an international consortium of clinicians and scientists. 

An overview of the meeting proceedings can be found HERE

 

 

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November 9, 2018

National Family Conference Presentation

It was my pleasure to deliver a presentation to the family conference attendees about current research studies, particularly focusing on those recruiting participants. My presentation slides are available HERE.

 

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October 4, 2018

Intestines & CCM1 Protein 


CCM1 protein has important functions outside of the brain.

Recent studies from the team at the University of Chicago find that KRIT1 is important to maintain proper barrier function in the cells lining our intestine. (The CCM1 protein is called KRIT1. The intestine is lined by a layer of epithelial cells.) Interestingly, the way KRIT1 regulates control of permeability in the intestine is unique from the way the protein regulates permeability in brain vessels. In the brain, mutation of CCM1 result in stress fibers forming inside with cell causing a change in physical structure, and these changes can be reversed with ROCK inhibitor drugs. Neither is the case in the epithelial layer of the intestine, highlighting the diverse roles of this multi-functional protein. Continued research in this area may shed light on how CCM1 mutations may be related to other inflammatory or gut-related diseases.

This article was published in the FASEB Journal, the abstract is available HERE.

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September 28, 2018

Reactive Oxygen Species, Oats & CCM 


Oats and oatmeal-derived products (think anti-itch soaps and shampoos) have long been known for their calming, anti-inflammatory and anti-itch properties. In recent years research teams have dissected the molecular characteristics of oats and identified compounds directly responsible for blocking inflammation and cell growth, and for neutralizing reactive oxygen species (ROS). For example, drugs derived from related compounds are used as anti-histamines to treat a variety of allergy-related ailments, including atopic dermatitis.

What does all this have to do with cavernous angioma? Last year, a collaborative team from the University of Torino, Italy and the Unversity of Rochester published findings on an important connection between CCM1 gene mutations and the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-08373-4) Excessive amounts of ROS can be damaging to cells. In the case of CCM1, these extra ROS molecules contribute to leaky blood vessels of CCM lesions. This study team was able to reverse the cellular effect of ROS using an oat-derived anti-oxidant molecule.

Now, we aren't ready to make any clinical recommendation of oat-therapy for CCM. But, this review highlights the importance of continued research into oat-derived molecules for a wide range of illnesses, including CCM, that are impacted by inflammation or antioxidants.

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September 24, 2018

CCM Lesions Develop (in part) like a Tumor

New research highlights the cancer-like quality of CCM lesions...

The illness in which Angioma Alliance keenly focuses is known by several names - Cavernous Angioma and Cerebral Cavernous Malformation (CCM) are terms often used interchangeably. Angioma implies a cancer-like quality or vascular tumor. While the term malformation is distinctly noncancerous. A traditional malformation grows only as the body grows in size, not independently, like a tumor.

Well, the research team at Duke University have used genetically engineered mice and advanced microscopy to show that from the earliest stage of development, CCM lesions (in the familial form) start with a random (somatic) mutation to completely destroy the function of one of the CCM genes in a brain endothelial cell. This mutational even changes the cell such that it starts to grow, and grow, and grow (through a process of cell division and duplication)... As it becomes a mature multi-cavernous large lesion, those mutant cells also recruit non-mutated blood vessel cells into the lesion.

The biological significance helps us understand better how lesions develop and identify new targets for future therapeutic intervention.

The video is a 3D reconstruction of a mouse CCM lesion. The green cells are all derived from the same parent that has two mutations in CCM3, while the yellow cells are from another mutant parent cell with two mutations, resulting in complete loss of function and lesion development. The video is of two neighboring mature ccm lesions, each derived from a unique somatic (random) mutational event.

The study was published in the journal of Circulation Research, the abstract is available HERE.

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September 4, 2018

International Collaboration Identifies FDA Approved Drug as Possible CCM Therapeutic 

A collaborative research team from Canada, Germany, and France combines the strengths of worm, fish and mouse biology with large dataset analysis to screen a large number of compounds and identify a potential new drug for the treatment of CCM.

The goal of the project was to identify druggable targets that are shared between multiple animal models of CCM disease. Those with the highest level of biological conservation may be more likely to translate to the human condition.

The research team screened thousands of compounds (previously approved drugs that, with promising results, might be repurposed for CCM therapy) in worm and fish models to identify candidates. Those candidates were then tested in human cell lines and then mouse models of CCM.

Focusing specifically on drugs that have previous safety profiles of long-term use with minimal side effects and that biologically interact with more than one known CCM-related chemical pathway, the team identified several molecules including, IR3mo as a CCM drug candidate. IR3mo is a derivative of indirubin which is the active ingredient in traditional Chinese medicine. IR3mo is currently approved by the FDA for use as a leukemia drug.

The final phase of this study included mouse testing. Acute CCM mouse models are genetically engineered to develop lots of lesions at a very early time of life (within a few days). Treatment with IR3mo significantly decreased the number of lesions in these mice.

The full text of this journal article is available online.

 

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July 19, 2018

Dr. Awad Explains Two New Studies

New webinar available about clinical trials for cavernous angioma!

In his presentation, Dr. Awad shares information about clinical trial phases, preparation for large multi-center studies, and how to participate in the new Atorvastatin Treatment Trial for Symptomatic Hemorrhage of Cavernous Angioma.

The video recording is available on youtube (as below), with more information about the trial readiness and atorvastatin studies on our website.

Watch Dr. Awad's WEBINAR on our youtube channel.

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July 10, 2018

Recursion Pharmaceuticals Receives FDA Clearance for Phase I Safety Trial


Making progress toward clinical trial! Recursion Pharmaceuticals @Recursionpharma announces they have achieved a regulatory milestone for the drug REC-994 (tempol) and plans to begin phase I safety trials later this year.

For more information, read their press release.